Artificial Intelligence – Can Computing Power Save Our Planet?

 

Artificial intelligence has long since solved complex tasks and made our everyday lives easier. But do intelligent computer programmes also provide new solutions for environmental and climate protection? Here we set out to find answers to these questions.

The New Transparent Open Source Model Tackling Learned Biases in AI

Until now, the development of AI-based technologies for recognising text and speech has been in the hands of large technology companies. BLOOM aims to make this more transparent.

EIBA

EIBA: Using AI to Support the Circular Economy

The EIBA project is developing an AI that identifies end-of-life parts to help reuse products instead of merely recycling them.

New AI and Image Recognition Software Can Detect How Animals are Feeling

The ability for machine learning algorithms to analyse huge amounts of information are making them indispensable tools for conservation research.

Artificial Intelligence – Can We Save our Planet with Computing Power?

Artificial intelligence has long since solved complex tasks and made our everyday lives easier. But do intelligent computer programmes also provide new solutions for environmental and climate protection?

Can Video Game Hardware Help Climate Research? Nvidia to Create a ‘Digital Twin’ of Earth

The manufacturer of graphics cards wants to use its know-how to recreate the Earth in a digital simulation on a unprecedented one metre scale.

How AI Can Advance Sustainable Logging and Cut Back on Deforestation

Trees are essential to our environment, but they're also a much needed building material. A German team is looking to use AI and data to create more sustainable forestry.

New York’s Portable Recycling Plant Highlights a Micro-Manufacturing Future

While some manufacturers are going big, others are looking to small, self-sustaining microfactories as a more sustainable way to build things.

Passive Citizen Science: Could Your Animal Photos Be Helping Science – Without You Even Knowing?

Citizen science usually requires an active participant to get - and stay - involved. Now researchers have been experimenting with a passive approach that deputises photographers into conservation and nature research, without them having to do anything.