Content to: 3D Printing

3D Printing: Adding a Sustainable Dimension to Modern Life

Modern 3D printing is already well on the way to revolutionising traditional manufacturing processes, but it also has huge potential for sustainable development and humanitarian aid.

Does the Future of 3D Printing Lie in Bioplastic Made of Algae?

Too much algae in fresh or marine water systems poses a threat to ecosystems. A US company is turning that dangerous excess algae into a sustainable material for 3D printing.

Sustainable 3D Printing – With Plastic Waste and Sugar Beets?

3D printing has huge potential for sustainable development. But if the filament used to print is made of plastic, how sustainable can it ever really be?

The Netherlands’ Solution for Affordable Homes? Social Housing Fresh From the 3D Printer

What sounds like a utopia is already becoming reality in France and the Netherlands: in just a few days, huge 3D printers are able to produce entire houses.

Cellink: the Ink That Allows Scientists to 3D Print Human Tissue

Revolutionary technology from a Swedish startup makes it possible to 3D print life-size human ears and noses in about thirty minutes. Could this be the future of organ transplants?

3D Printing and DIY Solutions Providing Rapid Response in Disaster Areas

In areas where supplies are scarce and infrastructure non-existent, could Field Ready's 3D printed solutions be the future of effective humanitarian aid?

Thumbs Up! A 3D Printer from Electronic Waste Is Our Favourite Project of the Month!

There are tonnes of good ideas that can change the world. Regular readers of RESET will already know of a few. Every month, we will choose one idea that stands out thanks to its impact and innovative approach. Our favourite project in August: open source 3D printers made from electronic waste!

Retr3D: Building 3D-Printers From Electronic Waste

How can a combination of open source software and a whole bunch of e-waste be opening up brand new perspectives for people in developing countries?

Turning Smartphones Into Microscopes for Less Than a Dollar

Researchers in the US have developed a small 3D-printable device with a lens that clips onto smartphones and can be used as an inexpensive microscope in regions where diagnostic equipment is not readily available.