News in: Biodiversity

 Kwita Izina (Rwanda's Gorilla Naming Ceremony)

Why Are Rwanda's Gorilla Conservationists Busy Thinking Up Baby Names?

Last month, Rwanda’s Development Board hosted an event called Kwita Izina, a traditional Rwandese naming ceremony for newborns. But there was something very un-traditional about the babies being celebrated. The country was honouring its gorilla population rather than its human one, the result of a success story that has seen numbers of the endangered species rising year on year. Read on

Tom Bech

A Pollination Highway Bee-comes Reality in Oslo

Environmentalists in Oslo, Norway have set up the world's first 'highway' for bees, encouraging businesses, households and schools to plant bee-friendly plants in open spaces to help bees safely navigate through the city and minimise any harmful impacts that urban settings have on bee populations. Read on

 Aamir Choudhry

Soil Matters in the Digital World

A smartphone application SoilWeb, developed by the UC Davis California Soil Resource Lab, is providing people in the field with up-to-date information about soil. Whether you are a farmer, a researcher, an engineer, an ecologist, a gardener or you are simply curious about this ubiquitous yet underrated resource called soil, upon which all human life depends, then this app is for you. Read on

USFS Region 5

Planting a Billion Trees In a Year - Can It Be Done with Drones?

Drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), are multi-functional. From delivering packages to wildlife surveillance, drones have been on the biodiversity frontlines as wildlife conservation tools. In our age of climate change and deforestation, drones now take a bigger step towards reversing the loss of forests and trees. Read on

Art G.

When Tigers "Say Cheese", They Are Found!

The facial recognition function on our digital cameras doesn’t only detect human faces, it can also be used to track the world’s endangered animals, like tigers! Simply download an app, game it and match a real wild tiger. Read on

 Karen

Finding Mammal – Automatic Device Helps Count Migrating Whales

The grey whale is one of the animal kingdom’s great migrators. Every year they migrate in groups called pods, swimming a 20,000 km round trip between Alaskan waters and the warmer Mexican coast close to Baja California. The other major group of grey whales lives in the seas of Korea. Scientists have developed a device to automatically track the formerly-endangered mammal. Read on